Text Box: HARMONIE AUTOGRAPHS AND MUSIC INC.

MUSIC AUTOGRAPHS & ANTIQUARIAN

Price: $450.00

NEAR MINT CONDITION

           GOFFREDO PETRASSI - COMPOSER
Text Box: MUSIC AUTOGRAPHS AND EPHEMERA BOUGHT AND SOLD
Text Box: COMPOSER AUTOGRAPHS

Phone: 212-860-5541

 

The composer pens a 4 bar musical quotation in tenor and bass voices from his 1941 “Coro di Morti” with Giacomo Leopardi’s text, Lieta no, ma sicura Dall'antico dolor. (translation: Happy no, but sure from the ancient pain), 1975.  The quotation measures, 3.5” x 9” and comes with an 8” x 10” photograph of the composer.

Petrassi (1904 - 2003) was a neoclassicist and one of the important and prolific Italian composers of the 20th Century.  Additionally, he was one of Italy’s great composition professors and taught among others, Ennio Morricone, who became his greatest disciple.  The “Coro di Morti” is considered to be Petrassi’s masterpiece for chorus.  Scored for male choir, a large brass contingent, percussion, 3 pianos and double bass, the work is often looked at from the unknowing as a Requiem a la Britten’s “War Requiem”.  In fact, Petrassi did not want the piece looked at that way.  He described it as a modern dramatic madrigal, with a nod to, Marenzio, Monteverdi and Stravinsky and steeped in his struggle with his Catholic faith, morality and death in a time of War.  He composed the piece between 1940 and 1941 and used the text from the 1835 “Operette Morali” album of poetry and prose by the short lived, early 19th Century Italian poet Giacomo Leopardi. (1798-1837) 

Morricone, referred to Petrassi in his autobiography, Ennio Morricone In His Own Words as his mentor, spoke of Petrassi’s Roman School and always listed him first in the list of those who influenced him.  One point he makes is, I tried to bring musical research into what I did for a living—arrangements and cinema.  Petrassi had always been adamant about the moral responsibilities of a composer.  If one listens to Morricone’s score from 1987 film, “The Untouchables”, one can hear some of the themes from “Coro di Morti” which he expands upon in the staccato themes in his score from the movie.  A loving touch from a man Morricone maintained a close friendship and as an advisor in both music and non-musical matters throughout his life.

“Coro di Morti” remains one of Petrassi’s most performed works. The premiere was at the Teatro Fenice in Venice, September 28, 1941.  The conductor Riccardo Muti is a fan of the work and has led performances at La Scala, The Philadelphia Orchestra and The New York Philharmonic.  Other performances have included, Teatro ‘dell Opera Roma, Teatro Regio Torino, Teatro di Cagliari, The American Symphony Orchestra and Orchestra Simfonica di Roma Radiotelevisione Italiana.  The work has been recorded and there are live performances on YouTube, including a live performance with Muti and The Philadelphia Orchestra.  The Teatro ‘dell Opera in Rome performed the work as a choreographed ballet.

Unusual and rare, perfect for display with the photograph!