Text Box: MUSICIAN AUTOGRAPHS
Text Box: HARMONIE AUTOGRAPHS AND MUSIC INC.

MUSIC AUTOGRAPHS & ANTIQUARIAN
Text Box: MUSIC AUTOGRAPHS AND EPHEMERA BOUGHT AND SOLD

Phone: 212-860-5541

 

Price: $200.00

FINE & EXCELLENT CONDITION

BERRYER MATINÉE MUSICALE

Autographed 4.25” x 5.5” concert ticket by the esteemed French politician, deputy, orator, member of the Académie Française and music patron Pierre-Antoine Berryer for a private concert at the Salle Herz in Paris, April 26, 1853. The concert was a benefit for the repairs of the church near his country chateau, Église de Saint Pierre et Saint Paul in Augerville-la-Rivière.  The singers and musicians for the concert were amongst the best available in Paris at the time including, bass Luigi Lablache, baritone Antonio Tamburini, tenor Jean-Antoine-Just Géraldy, tenor Italo Gardoni, cellist Alexandre Batta, pianist Henri Herz, pianist Alexandre Goria (crossed out), cellist Sebastien Lee, composer-conductor Jules Alary, cellist François-Emile Rignault and organist Louis-Francois-Alexandre Frêlon. (Final two written in).  A tax stamp of one centime appears on the verso.  We include a rare autographed Franck of Paris full length carte de visite photograph of the French lawyer, orator, politician and musical sponsor Pierre-Antoine Berryer dated October 26, 1862.

Pierre-Antoine Berryer (1790-1868) was a French lawyer, member of the French Parliament, deputy, orator and held “Seat Four” of the Académie Française. He was the most important music patron in France mid 19th Century.  In 1825, he purchased Chateau Augerville and updated and remodeled it so he could hold various arts festivals there.  The crème de la crème of French society, musicians, artists and poets would flock to his castle to attend and participate in his events.  Amongst his closest friends in the musical world included, Rossini, Chopin and Liszt who would attend with frequency.  A devout Catholic, he made the local church, Église de Saint Pierre et Saint Paul a pet project and he donated frequently, including the proceeds from his events to the upkeep of the building.  His death in 1868 was followed by a funeral with some 3,000 mourners including many from the music world and included a dozen funeral orations.  His tombstone bears the epitaph in translation, Eloquence Comes From the Heart. The Gentleman’s Magazine of London in their obituary described him as “The most eminent legal orator of modern France.”

The fact that Berryer could pull together such participants for his private concert is a testament not so much to the fees which may or may not have been paid, as it was a benefit, but to his importance in French society and his friendship with important musicians.  We know factually that Berryer had a long correspondence with the cellist Alexandre Batta, the finest in France at that time and one of the great in Europe.  Franz Liszt was known from time to time at these concerts to “sit in with the band” in chamber music and also played solo concerts.  The concert certainly hearkens back to a time where music patrons would run their own private concert series.  As an aside, Berryer was known to shed a tear and shake when he heard Mozart’s music which was often featured at his concerts.

We suspect that the name “Alary” must have been a typographical error and instead the name should have been the eminent French violinist Delphine Alard.  We also suspect the tickets were removed from an unscored booklet and therefore the left side has an irregular edge tear.