Text Box: HARMONIE AUTOGRAPHS AND MUSIC INC.

MUSIC AUTOGRAPHS & ANTIQUARIAN
Text Box: MUSIC AUTOGRAPHS AND EPHEMERA BOUGHT AND SOLD

Price: $350.00

FINE CONDITION

Second edition of Liszt’s controversial book, Des Bohemiens et de leur musique en Hongrie, published by Breitkopf und Hertl, 1881.  The lifetime revised edition was edited and substantially expanded by his mistress, Princess Carolyne zu Sayn-Wittgenstein from 349 pages in 1859 to 540 pages in 1881.  The book was custom bound with a lithograph floral motif, linen spine with gold nomenclature.

DES BOHÉMIENS/ET DR/LEUR MUSIQUE EN HONGRIE/PAR/F. LISZT/NOUVELLE EDITION/LEIPZIG/BREITKOPF ET HAERTEL/LIBRARIES - EDITEURS/1881/PARIS LIBRARIE FISCHBACHER

The book has free gray marble end-pages, frontispiece bears the title DES BOHEMIÉNS without decoration, and the ownership stamp with autograph name W. E. D’Agostino, followed by a blank page, the title page as described above with two stamps by W. E. D’Agostino and Wera Elena D’Agostino, the following page bears the legend “Tous les droits reserves.  Then there is a second frontispiece with the title of the book, followed by an end page and then the first page of the work entitles POÉSIE NATIONALE, the next page is page 4, which runs through page 538, followed by a 2 page table of contents.  On page 521 bears the library stamp of Paolo Litta.  The second page of the table of contents bears his stamp as well.

Our example comes directly from the estate of the Sicilian harpsichordist and musicologist Roberto Pagano, though it does not bear his name.  Previously it had belonged to the Italian composer Paolo Litta (1871-1931) and his wife, Wera Elena Litta who was a musicologist, author and translator of several volumes of books including an Italian language translation of the technique series of violinist Mathieu Crickboom.

Liszt’s (1811-1886) initial 1859 book published in Paris was well received by the public, except in Hungary.  Despite his Hungarian birth and his reputation as the leading piano virtuoso and a great composer of his day, the music critics did not feel that his interpretation of the position of gypsy music was well qualified.  On the other hand, as he was such an ambassador for Hungary in the music world, they did not want to offend him.  Essentially, it was Liszt’s feeling that the Gypsy music in Hungary was of no particular value until a great composer such as himself turned into a recognized masterpiece. He was in fact enamored of the music which he essentially looked upon as folk music and not for the merit of the tunes constructions.  He was also a great admirer in particular of the Gypsy violin virtuosi of his time and would even entertain them in Weimar.  A particular dinner at Mikhail Glinka’s home when he visited Russia was even staged with pine trees and a Gypsy orchestra while the guests ate their meals.  The dinner is enshrined in the 1952 Russian film, Glinka, with Sviatoslav Richter portraying Franz Liszt.  The book was enlarged by 191 pages by the Princess Sayn-Wittgenstein, Liszt’s former mistress and by that point close platonic friend. Despite the increase in text, the Hungarian musicologists of the day still were not kind to the second edition as well.

Today, the book is still utilized by musicologists and ethnomusicologists for it’s varieties of theories and is still the subject of academic discussion.

In fine condition, though some barely discernable light foxing on the first few pages at the beginning and end.

 

 

 

 

 

FRANZ LISZT - PIANIST & COMPOSER
Text Box: COMPOSER SPECIAL BOOKS

Phone: 212-860-5541